Upham's Corner Online

Lottery Commission Notification Process

Posted: December 7, 2011     Nancy J Conrad

This thread will be used to track the progress in updating the Lottery Commission Notification Process.

Danielson Tavares, aide to Rep. Carlos Henriquez, has agreed to look into the Lottery Commission notification process.  How does it work?  What enhancements to the process could be put in place easily to improve how the Commission interfaces with the standard Neighborhood Notification Process used by the City of Boston?

Formal Request to Rep. Carlos Henriquez: 
Review / update the Lottery Commission notification legislation to be compatible with the City of Boston Neighborhood Notification process.

To: Danielson Tavares, Legislative Aide to Rep. Carlos Henriquez
From: Upham’s Corner Improvement Association
Re: 
Lottery Commission Notification Process
Date: December 7, 2011
    
The purpose of this letter is to request an enhancement to the Lottery Commission notification process so that it can “fit” into the standards so effectively used in the City of Boston. 

The City of Boston uses a “neighborhood notification process” to inform civic and other concerned organizations and residents about pending changes – licenses, zoning, etc.  Notices go out via email and are also listed on the City of Boston Calendar. 

The Lottery Commission uses a 21-day legal notice in a major newspaper to communicate with communities.  This does not work in the City of Boston as concerned residents and organizations are “tuned into” the neighborhood notification process.

The incident that triggered this request is a Keno Monitor License that was issued to an Upham’s Corner business, El Frutero.  Had the neighborhood organizations known in advance of this request, they would not have supported it for several reasons.  The business is notoriously non-cooperative with police. That section of Dudley Street is frequently used for drug dealing. 

Now that the business has the Keno monitor, drug dealers are using the existence of the Keno game as an excuse for loitering and carrying out their drug business. The police report difficulties in “moving” the loiterers out of the area.

In a conversation with Danielson Tavares on Dec 7, 2011 he has agreed to the following:
  • Review the existing legislation and what process is prescribed for the Lottery Commission to follow
  • Amend the legislation (as appropriate) to provide a preliminary notification process.
While the focus here is Boston, other Commonwealth communities might very well benefit.  For the City of Boston, coordinating notification through the Department of Neighborhood Services would work.

What steps have been taken thus far?
  1. UCIA contacted the Lottery Commission in June regarding this issue.  Contact made again in mid-November.
  2. Article written in UC News
  3. Conversation with Lottery Commission General Counsel Bill Egan.  began@masslottery.com.  Note:  As of 11/16/11, Bill suggested we contact him again in a couple weeks
  4. Mike Moynihan works out of Sr Hart's office.  617-722-1150 He attended the November 2011 Upham’s Corner Westside Neighborhood Association meeting and said he would follow up on this issue.  Michael.Moynihan@masenate.gov
  5. On Dec 2, 2011 Mike sent Nancy Conrad email saying he would be forwarding the article to the Deputy Treasurer for Gov Affairs.

Letter to Rep Carlos Henriquez

To
Danielson Tavares, Legislative Aide to Rep. Carlos Henriquez
From
Nancy Conrad, Upham’s Corner Improvement Association
Re
Lottery Commission Notification Process
Date
December 7, 2011



The purpose of this letter is to request an enhancement to the Lottery Commission notification process so that it can “fit” into the standards so effectively used in the City of Boston. 

The City of Boston uses a “neighborhood notification process” to inform civic and other concerned organizations and residents about pending changes – licenses, zoning, etc.  Notices go out via email and are also listed on the City of Boston Calendar. 

The Lottery Commission uses a 21-day legal notice in a major newspaper to communicate with communities.  This does not work in the City of Boston as concerned residents and organizations are “tuned into” the neighborhood notification process.

The incident that triggered this request is a Keno Monitor License that was issued to an Upham’s Corner business, El Frutero.  Had the neighborhood organizations known in advance of this request, they would not have supported it for several reasons.  The business is notoriously non-cooperative with police. That section of Dudley Street is frequently used for drug dealing. 
Now that the business has the Keno monitor, drug dealers are using the existence of the Keno game as an excuse for loitering and carrying out their drug business. The police report difficulties in “moving” the loiterers out of the area.

In a conversation with Danielson Tavares on Dec 7, 2011 he has agreed to the following:

  • Review the existing legislation and what process is prescribed for the Lottery Commission to follow
  • Amend the legislation (as appropriate) to provide a preliminary notification process.
While the focus here is Boston, other Commonwealth communities might very well benefit.  For the City of Boston, coordinating notification through the Department of Neighborhood Services would work.
What steps have been taken thus far?

  • Nancy Conrad contacted the Lottery Commission in June regarding this issue.  Contact made again in mid-November.
  • Article written in UC News
  • Conversation with Lottery Commission General Counsel Bill Egan.  began@masslottery.com.  Note:  As of 11/16/11, Bill suggested we contact him again in a couple weeks
  • Mike Moynihan works out of Sr Hart's office.  617-722-1150 He attended the November 2011 Upham’s Corner Westside Neighborhood Association meeting and said he would follow up on this issue.  Michael.Moynihan@masenate.gov
  • On Dec 2, 2011 Mike sent Nancy Conrad email saying he would be forwarding the article to the Deputy Treasurer for Gov Affairs.


December 2, 2011 issue of Upham's Corner News reported on the issuance of a Keno Monitor License to a business in Upham's Corner.  The existence of the Keno game is being used as "cover" for drug dealing.

Keno Promoting Crime in Upham's Corner

Had the local neighborhood organizations known about the pending license, they would not have supported it.  They did not know about it despite the Lottery Commission's standard 21-day legal notice notification process because City of Boston civic organizations and residents depend on a Neighborhood Services notification process.  They do not read legal notices.

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